Vegan sesame roasted chickpeas

roasted chickpeas

If you’ve been reading Sarah in Shape for a while, or are a member of the Shape University community, you’ve probably noticed that I often advocate for healthy eaters to incorporate more vegetarian meals into their diet. I’ve even been mistaken as a vegetarian by a number of people! Although I do love vegetarian options and often enjoy meatless meals, I still count meat as a pillar of my diet. I guess you could call me a flexitarian.

That said, I’ve previously written about the way most modern societies eat far too much meat. I’ve also brought attention to the huge disconnect the modern world has between food and reality. Perhaps if we physically had to go through the ordeal and hard work of preparing an animal to be eaten, we’d eat much less of the stuff. I know I’d much rather pull a carrot out of the ground! You can read more about this in my post Why you should have a Meatless Monday

But the thing is, meat is a staple part of many people’s diets around the world. It will probably always be that way. But I can’t help but love the idea of humans just eating the amount of animal products that need to survive/stay healthy and no more. With less demand, the industry can then begin to focus on quality and not quantity. This will lead to a greater quality of life for the animals and a healthier product for consumers. It sounds like an idealistic dream, right? Well, I disagree. 

If we all begin making subtle changed in our diets in regard to the animal products we consume, we really do have the ability to change the world. Remember when veganism was just a bunch of so-called uptight hippies eating grass clippings? Well, the meat substitutes market is set to be worth over $5 billion AU by the end of the year. The change towards eating less meat is already underway, so jump aboard!

But can I eat all those carbohydrates and still lose weight?

Chickpeas and other legumes are also a great source of healthy carbohydrates that provide sustained energy. But the mention of carbohydrates might scare some people off – especially those trying to lose weight. The good news is you can eat carbohydrates and still lose weight – you just have to eat the right ones. Learn how with the healthy carbohydrates cheat sheet. It’s even got a list of meat-free, healthy carbohydrate foods.

This humble sesame roasted chickpea recipe might not seem like much. But to me, it marks a choice I made to consciously lower the amount of animal products I consume. For lunch, I usually had a salad, wrap or rice paper rolls with poached chicken breast. I wanted a lean protein that would keep me full for the smallest amount of calories. Now, my go-to lunch ingredient is these sesame roasted chickpeas. They’re perfect for meal prep and great in salads, buddha bowls, in wraps, on sandwiches and whatever else takes your fancy. They’re also a healthy, energy boosting afternoon snack if you’re not a fan of nuts. 

This sesame roasted chickpeas recipe is a meat substitute your body will love. It’s full of fibre, protein and healthy fats to keep you full and satisfied. And like with most of my recipes, it’s perfect for meal prep!

Vegan Sesame Roasted Chickpeas
A crunchy, healthy, vegan meat alternative that's perfect for salads, wraps, sandwiches or even by themselves as a snack.
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Prep Time
5 min
Cook Time
30 min
Total Time
35 min
Prep Time
5 min
Cook Time
30 min
Total Time
35 min
Ingredients
  1. 1 375g (13oz) bag dried chickpeas (garbanzo beans), cooked according to instructions, cooled
  2. *alternatively, three 400g (14oz) cans of precooked chickpeas
  3. 2 Tbsp sesame oil
  4. 1 Tbsp sesame seeds
Instructions
  1. Dry chickpeas with paper towel, lay out evenly on a baking tray.
  2. Coat evenly with sesame oil.
  3. Sprinkle with sesame seeds.
  4. Bake for 30 minutes on 180°C (355°F).
  5. Allow to cool completely.
Notes
  1. Store in a covered container for up to 7 days.
Sarah in Shape http://www.sarahinshape.com/

Let’s chat below! Do you think we rely too much on meat and animal products in our diets? Why/why not?

Do you think you could ever make a switch to eating more vegetarian meals?

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